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GQ

OCTOBER 2019

BRAD PITT IN CUSTOM BELT BY A. JASON ROSS STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA  PHOTOGRAPHS BY LACHLAN BAILEY

BRAD PITT IN CUSTOM BELT BY A. JASON ROSS STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA PHOTOGRAPHS BY LACHLAN BAILEY

BRAD PITT IN CUSTOM BELT BY A. JASON ROSS STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA  PHOTOGRAPHS BY LACHLAN BAILEY

BRAD PITT IN CUSTOM BELT BY A. JASON ROSS STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA PHOTOGRAPHS BY LACHLAN BAILEY

BRAD PITT IN CUSTOM BELT BY A. JASON ROSS STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA  PHOTOGRAPHS BY LACHLAN BAILEY

BRAD PITT IN CUSTOM BELT BY A. JASON ROSS STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA PHOTOGRAPHS BY LACHLAN BAILEY

BRAD PITT IN CUSTOM BELT BY A. JASON ROSS STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA  PHOTOGRAPHS BY LACHLAN BAILEY

BRAD PITT IN CUSTOM BELT BY A. JASON ROSS STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA PHOTOGRAPHS BY LACHLAN BAILEY

BRAD PITT IN CUSTOM BELT BY A. JASON ROSS STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA  PHOTOGRAPHS BY LACHLAN BAILEY

BRAD PITT IN CUSTOM BELT BY A. JASON ROSS STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA PHOTOGRAPHS BY LACHLAN BAILEY

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GQ

APRIL 2019

GQ May 2019 styled by George Cortina photography by studio jackson belt by A. Jason Ross

GQ May 2019 styled by George Cortina photography by studio jackson belt by A. Jason Ross

GQ May 2019 styled by George Cortina photography by studio jackson belt by A. Jason Ross

GQ May 2019 styled by George Cortina photography by studio jackson belt by A. Jason Ross

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ICON MAGAZINE

MARCH 2019

AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIO SORRENTI BELTS BY A. JASON ROSS

AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIO SORRENTI BELTS BY A. JASON ROSS

AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIO SORRENTI BELTS BY A. JASON ROSS

AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIO SORRENTI BELTS BY A. JASON ROSS

AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIO SORRENTI BELTS BY A. JASON ROSS

AARON TAYLOR-JOHNSON STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIO SORRENTI BELTS BY A. JASON ROSS

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WSJ MAGAZINE

Belted Bold Leathers Shape Up Fall Coats Turn voluminous coats into centered, sculptural silhouettes

Photography by Hanna Tveite for WSJ. Magazine, Fashion Editor: Alexander Fisher

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V MAGAZINE

#109

DUCKIE THOT & HANNAH FERGUSON BY MARIO TESTINO FOR V MAGAZINE #109 STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

DUCKIE THOT & HANNAH FERGUSON BY MARIO TESTINO FOR V MAGAZINE #109 STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

DUCKIE THOT & HANNAH FERGUSON BY MARIO TESTINO FOR V MAGAZINE #109 STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

DUCKIE THOT & HANNAH FERGUSON BY MARIO TESTINO FOR V MAGAZINE #109 STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

DUCKIE THOT & HANNAH FERGUSON BY MARIO TESTINO FOR V MAGAZINE #109 STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

DUCKIE THOT & HANNAH FERGUSON BY MARIO TESTINO FOR V MAGAZINE #109 STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

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WSJ

FALL 2019

Photography by Josh Olins, Styling by Ludivine Poiblanc, Prop Styling by Kadu Lennox

Photography by Josh Olins, Styling by Ludivine Poiblanc, BELTS BY A. JASON ROSS

Photography by Josh Olins, Styling by Ludivine Poiblanc, BELTS BY A. JASON ROSS

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WSJ MAGAZINE

MARCH 2017

GISELLE IN WSJ MAGAZINE STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA- BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

GISELLE IN WSJ MAGAZINE STYLED BY GEORGE CORTINA- BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

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WSJ MAGAZINE

SPRING 2017

Neutral Pieces Add a Refined Elegance for Spring

This season's breezy staples in beiges, tans and khakis

Photography by Benjamin Vnuk; Fashion Editor Laura Stoloff

Photography by Benjamin Vnuk; Fashion Editor Laura Stoloff BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

Photography by Benjamin Vnuk; Fashion Editor Laura Stoloff BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

Photography by Benjamin Vnuk; Fashion Editor Laura Stoloff BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

Photography by Benjamin Vnuk; Fashion Editor Laura Stoloff BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

Photography by Benjamin Vnuk; Fashion Editor Laura Stoloff BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

Photography by Benjamin Vnuk; Fashion Editor Laura Stoloff BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

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WSJ

NOVEMBER 2017

WALL STREET JOURNAL MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2017 STYLES BY ALEX G. FISHER BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

WALL STREET JOURNAL MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2017 STYLES BY ALEX G. FISHER BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

WALL STREET JOURNAL MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2017 STYLES BY ALEX G. FISHER BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

WALL STREET JOURNAL MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2017 STYLES BY ALEX G. FISHER BELT BY A. JASON ROSS

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W MAGAZINE

FEBRUARY 2010

W MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2010 RAQUEL ZIMMERMAN SHOT BY MARIO SORRENTI STYLED BY CAMILA NICKERSON - LEATHER CUFF BY A. JASON ROSS

W MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2010 RAQUEL ZIMMERMAN SHOT BY MARIO SORRENTI STYLED BY CAMILA NICKERSON - LEATHER CUFF BY A. JASON ROSS

W MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2010 RAQUEL ZIMMERMAN SHOT BY MARIO SORRENTI STYLED BY CAMILA NICKERSON - LEATHER CUFF BY A. JASON ROSS

W MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2010 RAQUEL ZIMMERMAN SHOT BY MARIO SORRENTI STYLED BY CAMILA NICKERSON - LEATHER CUFF BY A. JASON ROSS

W MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2010 RAQUEL ZIMMERMAN SHOT BY MARIO SORRENTI STYLED BY CAMILA NICKERSON - LEATHER CUFF BY A. JASON ROSS

W MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2010 RAQUEL ZIMMERMAN SHOT BY MARIO SORRENTI STYLED BY CAMILA NICKERSON - LEATHER CUFF BY A. JASON ROSS

W MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2010 RAQUEL ZIMMERMAN SHOT BY MARIO SORRENTI STYLED BY CAMILA NICKERSON - LEATHER CUFF BY A. JASON ROSS

W MAGAZINE FEBRUARY 2010 RAQUEL ZIMMERMAN SHOT BY MARIO SORRENTI STYLED BY CAMILA NICKERSON - LEATHER CUFF BY A. JASON ROSS

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Artist in Residence: Jason Ross

JULY 2012

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Artist in Residence: Jason Ross

by

Fan Zhong

The first of an ongoing series in which we invite ourselves over to see where artists work.

I live on the top floor of a former luggage factory in Red Hook, Brooklyn. Long turned residential, its apartments are sometimes listed as “luxury lofts,” a claim I find disputable. The building, nevertheless, is ideal for the many artists and artisans who live and work there. One of these people is Jason Ross, whose 1,100-square foot space is filled with the heady scent of leather. Ross, a former model, has recently started making leather accessories under the name Artemas Quibble for the Rick Owens store in Paris, in addition to longtime clients like Donna Karan, Urban Zen, and Henry Beguelin.

Nearly everything in his studio has been altered to Ross’s specifications. “Jason is super particular,” Natasha Chekoudjian, his girlfriend and muse, said when I visited recently. We were sitting at a table covered with burnished animal hide, of his construction. (ABC Home, she told me, is interested in having Ross make furniture for them.) On the walls hang custom-made tools, leather samples, and various odds and ends from antiquing trips, waiting for their moment. “Something can be up there for 10 years,” Ross said. “Then one day I’ll pull it down and turn it into something.” Like a piece of Chinese bronze, or a jeweler’s discarded vise, or an old doorknocker—all of these found objects have been appropriated by Ross and transformed into modern pieces, albeit with borrowed histories. Components stripped from an antique scale, for example, form the improvised metal closure on a belt Ross made for Rick Owens. “He said he’d never seen anything like that,” Ross said. In the designer’s Paris store currently, you can find six Artemas Quibble pieces—belts, iPad cases, and a leather envelope.

It was actually during the early nineties that Ross, now 46, first became friendly with the designer, when they both lived in L.A. At the time, Ross was an aspiring screenwriter who modeled on the side. He was a cliché, he agreed. “I had long hair,” he said. “I wore these long flowing shirts. And somehow I couldn’t figure out why I wasn’t succeeding.”  One night, he caught a documentary on Salvador Dali. The artist had attempted to change his life by shaving off his locks; inspired, and/or at a loss for better ideas, Ross followed suit. Almost immediately, he landed a major modeling gig—the iconic first CK One campaign, which ran in 1995. Ross flew to New York to be shot alongside Kate Moss, Stella Tennant, Trish Goff, Jenny Howarth, and Bijou Phillips by Steven Meisel. “Oh,” he added, “and I got to make out with Veruschka.”  It was a heady time. But he soon found that modeling, like screenwriting, was not really for him. Ross had been designing and installing stone mosaics and in 2005 he started working with leather. “Everything I learned from mosaic I brought to leatherworking,” he said. He got really into ancient methods of working. He even frequented Renaissance fairs for ideas. “Those guys are really serious,” he told me, with all earnestness.  “I want to show you something,” he said, sitting down at his computer. Onscreen, he navigated to the transcript of an interview Rick Owens gave in 1999. In it, the designer says that he doesn’t care to be surrounded by “young people with cute hair cuts … I need old people who know how to make things.”  Ross smiled. “That’s me.”

It was actually during the early nineties that Ross, now 46, first became friendly with the designer, when they both lived in L.A. At the time, Ross was an aspiring screenwriter who modeled on the side. He was a cliché, he agreed. “I had long hair,” he said. “I wore these long flowing shirts. And somehow I couldn’t figure out why I wasn’t succeeding.”

One night, he caught a documentary on Salvador Dali. The artist had attempted to change his life by shaving off his locks; inspired, and/or at a loss for better ideas, Ross followed suit. Almost immediately, he landed a major modeling gig—the iconic first CK One campaign, which ran in 1995. Ross flew to New York to be shot alongside Kate Moss, Stella Tennant, Trish Goff, Jenny Howarth, and Bijou Phillips by Steven Meisel. “Oh,” he added, “and I got to make out with Veruschka.”

It was a heady time. But he soon found that modeling, like screenwriting, was not really for him. Ross had been designing and installing stone mosaics and in 2005 he started working with leather. “Everything I learned from mosaic I brought to leatherworking,” he said. He got really into ancient methods of working. He even frequented Renaissance fairs for ideas. “Those guys are really serious,” he told me, with all earnestness.

“I want to show you something,” he said, sitting down at his computer. Onscreen, he navigated to the transcript of an interview Rick Owens gave in 1999. In it, the designer says that he doesn’t care to be surrounded by “young people with cute hair cuts … I need old people who know how to make things.”

Ross smiled. “That’s me.”

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FEBRUARY 2012

BY KAREN DAY

A self-taught woodworker, Jason Ross‘ foray into leather goods happened by chance. While working on a furniture project in a friend’s woodshop, Ross noticed a band saw running on a leather belt and was so impressed it still worked that he “immediately contacted the company and bought scraps by the pound,” he says. The natural artisan taught himself how to manipulate his newfound medium and began integrating leather into his woodworking.

Today Ross peddles his expertly crafted leather accessories under the moniker Artemas Quibble, a name that suggests his continued interest in ancient objects and techniques. Working out of his studio in Brooklyn, Ross and his team create each belt, bag and jewelry item by hand for his own label as well as for his collaboration with Donna Karan.

JASON SHOT IN HIS STUDIO PHOTO BY RUEDIGER GLATZ

JASON SHOT IN HIS STUDIO PHOTO BY RUEDIGER GLATZ

“I enjoy reading how archaeologists think through the purpose of things and materials,” Ross explains. Gleaning insight from his favorite archaeology website, Ross learns from the methods of thinking and draws conclusions from fragmented evidence. These informed interpretations provide a foundation of authenticity for a mien blending the primitive with the modern. “I generally look for an aesthetically pleasing decorative or functional element that can’t be traced to one culture or another,” he notes.

Ross’ understanding of material also stems from his father—the inventor of the first plastic push-pin for Moore Push-Pin—who taught him about memory in materials. This guidance helped Ross develop one of his ingenious techniques, based on a “rivet-less” closure system in which a piece of leather is looped around itself or a piece of hardware and strung through a hole to hold it firmly in place without any give, even as the hide wears over time.

The idea really clicked when Ross began deconstructing an African hunting bag given to him by Graham Cassie, on which, he says, “leather thongs were stitched through holes to hold the various panels of the bag together.” He explains, “I could not, in most cases pull the old straps through the holes. The holes had been stretched and seemed to lock around the leather. I was forced to cut the straps in order to deconstruct the leather.” Ross uses the ancient concept to lock leather to leather as a way of holding hardware, which he also forges in his workshop.

JASON SHOT IN HIS STUDIO PHOTO BY RUEDIGER GLATZ

JASON SHOT IN HIS STUDIO PHOTO BY RUEDIGER GLATZ

A former Calvin Klein model, Ross’ interest in accessories seems like a natural progression, but his obsession with his craft goes beyond a connection to fashion. “I think that I appreciate beauty in discarded objects and remake those things, perhaps there is a connection to reading about excavations and discovery,” he says. The pieces he creates truly reflect his thoughtful nature and talent for combining the past with the future.

JASON SHOT IN HIS STUDIO PHOTO BY RUEDIGER GLATZ

JASON SHOT IN HIS STUDIO PHOTO BY RUEDIGER GLATZ

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NY TIMES

T MAGAZINE

Spring Fashion 2011: The Pleated Skirt

Photographed by Maciak Kobielski

Styled by Vanessa Traina

NY TIMES T MAGAZINE SPRING 2011 LEATHER CUFF BY A. JASON ROSS

NY TIMES T MAGAZINE SPRING 2011 LEATHER CUFF BY A. JASON ROSS

NY TIMES T MAGAZINE SPRING 2011 SOLID BRASS CUFFS BY A. JASON ROSS

NY TIMES T MAGAZINE SPRING 2011 SOLID BRASS CUFFS BY A. JASON ROSS

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NY TIMES T MAGAZINE

MARCH 2011

NYTIMES T MAGAZINE 2011 CUSTOM LEATHER WATCH STRAP BY A. JASON ROSS

NYTIMES T MAGAZINE 2011 CUSTOM LEATHER WATCH STRAP BY A. JASON ROSS

Saving Face

BY EDWARD BARSAMIAN

The Brooklyn-based jeweler A. Jason Ross is part Indiana Jones, part dandy. His latest venture, the Watch Transformation Project (starting at $5,500), is a service for men who want to give some edge to underused timepieces. Clients supply their own watches — a Cartier, say — and Ross swaps the band for rugged straps and then bundles it in a stylish leather case that would look nice on a nightstand next to a fedora.