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Jason Ross’s accessories are like no other you’ve ever experienced, a mix of antiquity and a rough-hewn sophistication. With the formal label Artemas Quibble and the Creatures of Mme du Barry, every leather piece is handcrafted and embellished with silver, brass and antique objects, making each piece distinctively unique. Ross’s work of hand-made artistry resonates with the soulful history of the reclaimed elements.

“Jason’s work is raw, sexy and artistic,” says Donna. “It comes from the soul, and instantly becomes a part of you when you wear it. They’re personal objects of desire you’ll own forever.”

Bringing a modern sensibility to ancient finds, Jason considers his work, which includes handmade jewelry, belts and bags, “a celebration of what has been lost.”  He speaks of the work that went into the antique elements he incorporates, whether it’s a 16th century leather book cover made into a belt or vintage finial crafted into a pendant. “So much work has already been put into my pieces by people who weren’t necessarily appreciated or respected. I’m able to showcase their work and give it a new life.” Friends who have an eye for detail will help Jason scout for objects, which he will hang up on his wall until inspiration strikes.

 

Not surprisingly, Jason is “an armchair history buff” and logs into archeology.org every day for inspiration. “Every found object tells a story, what it was used for, why it was there. It’s very exciting to piece it all together.” Jason, who lives and works in Red Hook, Brooklyn, loves the challenge of working with imposed limitations. He’s made many of the tools he works with, admiring the patina and character the tools impart on the materials. Jason cites his parents as his chief influences; his father is an accomplished inventor, creating the first plastic push-pin, and his mother introduced the first bullet belt.  As his sought-after work so beautifully illustrates, Jason continues the family tradition of innovation with his own distinct touch of style and soul.